Business Lessons from the movie "The Founder"

Who here has watched the The Founder? :raising_hand_man:t5::raising_hand_woman:t5:
I’m always fascinated by true life stories and this I watched recently.

The movie is based on the story of the McDonald’s business which was founded by two brothers (McDonald brothers), but ended up being taken away from them by Ray Kroc, their salesman who outsmart them. Ray Kroc today is identified as the Founder of McDonald’s.

What I learned in summary are:

  • Curiosity: Ray Kroc used to sell milkshake machines to restaurants and it was not very lucrative. One day, he gets an order for 8 machines from a very far restaurant. He got curious as to why so many milkshake machines are ordered by one restaurant. He could have simply delivered the machines via a dispatch service, but he traveled the distance to see the restaurant and that was how he discovered McDonald’s.

  • Persistence: The McDonald brothers slacked a lot. They just felt very comfortable with their failed attempts and usual way of doing things. Ray Kroc appeared to have more ginger and belief in the brand more than them. Business owners must always believe in their brand.

  • Be open to fresh insights: Ray Kroc suggested great ideas to the brothers but they weren’t open to welcoming them. They were supposed to partner with Coca Cola and use powdered milkshake, but they refused.

    Fresh insights worked perfectly for Ray Kroc after he accidentally met a consultant that overheard his conversation at the bank. The guy made him know that by purchasing plots of land that would be leased to the franchisees, it would create a revenue stream that can be used for expansion.

  • Written and well negotiated contracts are super important: I used to wonder why @atynukeh (of @Cregital) used to hala about signed contracts and vex when an agreement is not properly documented in paper. An unclear and unwritten contract can make or mar an agreement, and that was what marred the McDonald brothers.

    Ray Kroc offered a blank check to settle the business and the brothers agreed to a $2.7 million lump sum payment, ownership of their original restaurant in San Bernardino, and a 1% annual royalty, but when the time comes to finalize the agreement, Ray Kroc refused to include the royalty in the settlement and instead offered it as a handshake deal. In the end, we discover that the McDonald brothers were never paid their royalties, which could have been earning them around $100 million every year.

  • Marry someone in sync with your ambition: Ray Kroc divorced his wife and married one of his investor’s wife because she had the same drive he had for the business, unlike his wife who was very laidback.

The movie didn’t seem interesting at first but there were powerful lessons to learn. If you have watched the movie, what did you learn?

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Now I need to finally see this movie.

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Lovely movie. You should see it. Don’t forget to come back here to share what you learn.

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Nice review here Yeye.
Have this on my list already.

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Awesome lessons.

True

Right. This is where some persons fail, they feel they already know it all.

So true. Only then can you say, agreement is agreement

You are right though, but your spouse doesn’t necessarily need to be in the same line of business. The most important role they can play is to always be there to support, and not nagging all the time.

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I’ve added this to my movie list.

You did a great job with the review, Yeside. :blush::wink:

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Downloading this already. Thank you!

Your spouse should not only give you the space and Peace you need but should also act as a competent sounding board that you can bounce ideas back and forth with. When you think of a concept the first thing that comes to mind is “I want to know what he or she thinks of it.”

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That is the support I’m talking about. :blush:

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Deep!!! :clap:t5::clap:t5:

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I have watched this movie… watched it back then when i was in Bayelsa… Like its super motivating and has alot to learn from.

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You’ve said it all @Yeye

I didn’t delete the movie (what I do without thinking) after watching. It’s too loaded with insights and buttresses the fact that, salespeople make the best CEOs. In fact, 20% of Fortune 500 CEOs started out in sales and marketing.

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@Oluwarufus I’ll like to copy the movie. Please don’t delete it. Thank you

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It’s sitting on my desktop, you can copy anytime you stop by the office. :v:t4:

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Very insightful read.
Going to look for the movie

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Yeah… They always have that extra sense…

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Babe!! You summarized it aptly! It’s one of the movies I haven’t deleted. Thanks for this!

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I need to see this movie

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I don’t like this movie and hence cannot rate it high. This woman Maria Tanjala, Co-Founder, Big Couch, summarized my thoughts in a more polite way and I quote

"I acknowledge his perseverance, grit, determination and focus, but where is the rest? I couldn’t identify myself and my team with this story. Good business leaders shouldn’t make choices between profits and ethics. Ray’s character was lacking patience and communication skills when interacting with his business associates. Times were different then, but the decisions he made and his behavior were questionable. Business leaders need to follow ethical principles.”

This movie keeps spreading one wrong generally accepted gospel; that entrepreneurs are crooks and to be successful, you need to be evil and heartless. This is simply not true.

This is the kind of employee every entrepreneur should not pray to have. Someone who’s primary goal is not to grow your business but to take over it because they feel you’re not good enough.

I dey vex ooo… Come and give me back my data @yeye :joy::joy::joy::joy:

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Really :smile:

Different strokes for different folks my dear. What people focus on in movies is different. I was only seeing Ray Kroc being a wicked person at first but my mindset changed after a while.

Ray Kroc did his best for the original Founders. The guy was genuinely interested in the business, gave ideas, did all the running around. But what do people have to say about the laidback attitude of the brothers?

Entrepreneurs should be out there. Someone still explained the reason why Jobs is the more popular Steve at Apple. It’s because he was more business minded and not because he was wicked. Wozniak his Co-founder was very laidback. Who laidback in business epp?

Ray Kroc saw potential in the business and when he took over the whole thing and even said they could not use their name anymore and built a franchise opposite the original store, I felt he was wicked.

The lesson is for entrepreneurs or owners of their businesses to be passionate. No other person should be more passionate about your business than you. Be your own brand ambassador. It’s your business, take charge. So I don’t think it’s the story of the wicked employee that kicked out his bosses or the kind of employee employers should pray not to have. I feel it’s deeper than that. If employee and employers have that same level of passion about a business, the business is going to be mega.

The brothers never even left where they were to visit other franchises. They just gummed to where they were. There was just a very clear business attitude between Kroc and the brothers.

It’s a true life story meaning it happened real life so it’s up to people to choose to learn from what the brothers failed to do or what Kroc did right or wrong. It’s really just left for people to decide what business lesson they wanna pick.

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